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'''Back Orifice''' (often shortened to '''BO''') is a controversial [[computer program]] designed for [[remote]] [[system]] administration. It enables a [[user]] to control a [[computer]] running the [[Microsoft Windows]] [[operating system]] from a [[remote]] location. The name is a word play on "Microsoft BackOffice Server" [[software]].
 
'''Back Orifice''' (often shortened to '''BO''') is a controversial [[computer program]] designed for [[remote]] [[system]] administration. It enables a [[user]] to control a [[computer]] running the [[Microsoft Windows]] [[operating system]] from a [[remote]] location. The name is a word play on "Microsoft BackOffice Server" [[software]].
 
== Overview ==
 
 
"Back Orifice was . . . created in 1998 by [[hacker]]s from the Cult of the Dead Cow, apparently to highlight [[Microsoft]]'s lack of [[security]]. The backdoor allowed the sender to [[remotely control]] and [[monitor]] a [[computer]] running [[Windows]] 95 or 98. Once [[install]]ed, the program did not show up in the [[user]]'s task manager, giving it the potential to run undetected. Microsoft issued a [[patch]]."<ref>[[Counting the Cost: Cyber Exposure Decoded]], at 26.</ref>
 
   
 
Although Back Orifice has legitimate purposes, such as [[remote]] administration, there are other factors that make it suited for less benign business. The [[server]] can hide itself from cursory looks by [[user]]s of the [[system]]. As the [[server]] can be [[install]]ed without [[user]] [[interaction]], it can be [[distribute]]d as a [[payload]] of a [[Trojan horse]].
 
Although Back Orifice has legitimate purposes, such as [[remote]] administration, there are other factors that make it suited for less benign business. The [[server]] can hide itself from cursory looks by [[user]]s of the [[system]]. As the [[server]] can be [[install]]ed without [[user]] [[interaction]], it can be [[distribute]]d as a [[payload]] of a [[Trojan horse]].

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