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== Definitions ==
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=== Blockchain technology ===
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A '''digital identity''' is
 
A '''digital identity''' is
   
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{{Quote|an [[online]] or [[networked]] [[identity]] adopted or claimed in [[cyberspace]] by an individual, organization, or [[electronic device]].<ref>"Blockchain Technology Glossary" ([http://www.blockchaintechnologies.com/blockchain-glossary#sthash.vso6OeJI.dpuf full-text]).</ref>}}
{{Quote|[t]he electronic representation of an entity (e.g., a [[device]], [[software]], [[service]], organization or individual) in [[cyberspace]] that is [[comprise]]d of an [[information artifact]] or correlated [[information set]]s.}}
 
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=== General ===
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A '''digital identity''' is
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{{Quote|[t]he [[electronic]] representation of an entity (e.g., a [[device]], [[software]], [[service]], organization or individual) in [[cyberspace]] that is comprised of an [[information artifact]] or correlated [[information set]]s.<ref>[[National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace]]: Creating Options for Enhanced Online Security and Privacy, at 32.</ref>}}
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{{Quote|the unique representation of a subject engaged in an [[online]] [[transaction]].<ref>[[NIST Special Publications 800-63-B]], § 2.</ref>}}
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{{Quote|an entity's [[online]] presence, encompassing [[personal identifying information]]. It can be interpreted as the [[codification]] of identity names and [[attribute]]s of a physical instance. The use of digital identities is now widespread as the entire collection of [[information]] generated by a person's [[online]] activity.<ref>[[Big Data: Big Today, Normal Tomorrow]], at 1.</ref>}}
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== Overview (General) ==
   
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"A digital identity is always unique in the context of a [[digital service]], but does not necessarily need to be [[traceable]] back to a specific real-life subject. In other words, [[access]]ing a [[digital service]] may not mean that the underlying subject's real-life representation is known. [[Identity proofing]] establishes that a subject is actually who they claim to be."<ref>''Id''</ref>
== Source ==
 
   
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== References ==
* The White House, (Draft) National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace: Creating Options for Enhanced Online Security and Privacy 32 (June 25, 2010).[http://www.nstic.ideascale.com]
 
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<references />
   
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==
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* [[Profile]]
 
* [[Profile]]
 
[[Category:Data]]
 
[[Category:Data]]
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[[Category:Definition]]
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[[Category:Blockchain]]

Latest revision as of 04:29, 22 May 2021

Definitions[edit | edit source]

Blockchain technology[edit | edit source]

A digital identity is

an online or networked identity adopted or claimed in cyberspace by an individual, organization, or electronic device.[1]

General[edit | edit source]

A digital identity is

[t]he electronic representation of an entity (e.g., a device, software, service, organization or individual) in cyberspace that is comprised of an information artifact or correlated information sets.[2]
the unique representation of a subject engaged in an online transaction.[3]
an entity's online presence, encompassing personal identifying information. It can be interpreted as the codification of identity names and attributes of a physical instance. The use of digital identities is now widespread as the entire collection of information generated by a person's online activity.[4]

Overview (General)[edit | edit source]

"A digital identity is always unique in the context of a digital service, but does not necessarily need to be traceable back to a specific real-life subject. In other words, accessing a digital service may not mean that the underlying subject's real-life representation is known. Identity proofing establishes that a subject is actually who they claim to be."[5]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Blockchain Technology Glossary" (full-text).
  2. National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace: Creating Options for Enhanced Online Security and Privacy, at 32.
  3. NIST Special Publications 800-63-B, § 2.
  4. Big Data: Big Today, Normal Tomorrow, at 1.
  5. Id

See also[edit | edit source]

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