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* [[sensor]]/[[actuator]] control (a [[computer]] that acts as a [[decision engine]], analyzing [[sensor]] [[input]] and sending [[signal]]s to mechanisms that control the car)
 
* [[sensor]]/[[actuator]] control (a [[computer]] that acts as a [[decision engine]], analyzing [[sensor]] [[input]] and sending [[signal]]s to mechanisms that control the car)
 
* [[wireless]] [[access]] to [[computer system]]s (which allows [[communication]] with other [[AV]]s, [[connected]] roadways, and [[authorized]] [[network]]s, such as the manufacturer's)
 
* [[wireless]] [[access]] to [[computer system]]s (which allows [[communication]] with other [[AV]]s, [[connected]] roadways, and [[authorized]] [[network]]s, such as the manufacturer's)
* [[autopilot]] and navigator elements to control vehicle movement and direction.
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* [[autopilot]] and navigator elements to control vehicle movement and direction.<ref>[[When Autonomous Vehicles Are Hacked, Who Is Liable?]], at 6-7.</ref>
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== References ==
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<references />
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[[Category:Robotics]]
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[[Category:Unmanned]]
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[[Category:Cybersecurity]]

Latest revision as of 20:13, 21 July 2019

Overview[]

A fully autonomous vehicle uses onboard sensors and computers to understand its surroundings, plan its actions, and execute those plans to reach a destination. Some of the most important components of an AV that are relevant to cyberattacks on AVs include:

References[]