The IT Law Wiki
Line 5: Line 5:
 
== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
   
Modern GPUs are very efficient at [[manipulating]] and [[display]]ing [[computer graphic]]s, and their highly parallel structure makes them more effective than general-purpose [[CPU]]s for a range of complex [[algorithm]]s. A GPU can sit on top of a [[video card]], or it can be integrated directly into the [[motherboard]]. More than 90% of new [[desktop computer|desktop]] and [[notebook computer]]s have [[integrated]] GPUs, which are usually far less powerful than those on a [[video card]].
+
Modern GPUs are very efficient at [[manipulating]] and [[display]]ing [[computer graphics]], and their highly parallel structure makes them more effective than general-purpose [[CPU]]s for a range of complex [[algorithm]]s. A GPU can sit on top of a [[video card]], or it can be integrated directly into the [[motherboard]]. More than 90% of new [[desktop computer|desktop]] and [[notebook computer]]s have [[integrated]] GPUs, which are usually far less powerful than those on a [[video card]].
 
[[Category:Hardware]]
 
[[Category:Hardware]]
 
[[Category:Definition]]
 
[[Category:Definition]]

Revision as of 04:25, 8 August 2012

Definition

A graphics processing unit (GPU) (also occasionally called visual processing unit or VPU) is a dedicated graphics rendering device for a personal computer, workstation, or game console.

Overview

Modern GPUs are very efficient at manipulating and displaying computer graphics, and their highly parallel structure makes them more effective than general-purpose CPUs for a range of complex algorithms. A GPU can sit on top of a video card, or it can be integrated directly into the motherboard. More than 90% of new desktop and notebook computers have integrated GPUs, which are usually far less powerful than those on a video card.