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== Definition ==
 
== Definition ==
   
 
The '''Internet Protocol''' is a set of procedures in a telecommunications network that terminals or nodes in that network use to send signals back and forth and that track the address of nodes, route outgoing messages, and recognize incoming messages.
The '''Internet Protocol''' is
 
 
{{Quote|[a] formal set of conventions (both semantic and syntactic) governing the [[format]] and control of [[interaction]] among parts of the [[system]] that [[communicate]]s with each other.<ref>[[Cybersecurity A Primer for State Utility Regulators]], App. B.</ref>}}
 
 
{{Quote|a set of procedures in a [[telecommunications network]] that [[terminal]]s or [[node]]s in that [[network]] use to send [[signal]]s back and forth and that [[track]] the address of [[node]]s, [[route]] outgoing [[message]]s, and recognize incoming messages.}}
 
 
== Overview ==
 
   
 
The existing Internet Protocol ([[Internet Protocol Version 4]] ([[IPv4]])) &mdash; supports a maximum of 4.3 billion [[IP address]]es, limiting the number of devices that can be given a unique [[IP address]] to connect to the [[Internet]].
 
The existing Internet Protocol ([[Internet Protocol Version 4]] ([[IPv4]])) &mdash; supports a maximum of 4.3 billion [[IP address]]es, limiting the number of devices that can be given a unique [[IP address]] to connect to the [[Internet]].

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