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== Overview ==
 
== Overview ==
   
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{{Quote|Object code often is directly [[execute|executable]] by the [[computer]] into which it is entered. It sometimes contains [[instruction]]s, however, that are [[readable]] only by [[computer]]s containing a particular [[processor]], such as a Pentium [[processor]], or a specific [[operating system]] such as [[Microsoft]] Windows. In such instances, a [[computer]] lacking the specific [[processor]] or [[operating system]] can [[execute]] the object code only if it has an [[emulator]] program that simulates the necessary [[processor]] or [[operating system]] or if the [[code]] first is run through a [[translator]] [[program]] that [[convert]]s it into object code [[readable]] by that [[computer]].<ref>[[Universal City Studios v. Reimerdes|Universal City Studios, Inc. v. Reimerdes,]] 111 F.Supp.2d 294, 306 n.18 (S.D.N.Y. 2000) ([http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=4887310188384829978&q=111+F.Supp.2d+294&hl=en&as_sdt=2002 full-text]) (footnotes omitted).</ref>}}
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{{Quote|Object code often is directly [[execute|executable]] by the [[computer]] into which it is entered. It sometimes contains [[instruction]]s, however, that are readable only by [[computer]]s containing a particular [[processor]], such as a Pentium [[processor]], or a specific [[operating system]] such as [[Microsoft]] Windows. In such instances, a [[computer]] lacking the specific [[processor]] or [[operating system]] can [[execute]] the object code only if it has an [[emulator]] program that simulates the necessary [[processor]] or [[operating system]] or if the [[code]] first is run through a [[translator ]] [[program]] that [[convert]]s it into object code readable by that [[computer]].<ref>[[Universal City Studios v. Reimerdes|Universal City Studios, Inc. v. Reimerdes,]] 111 F.Supp.2d 294, 306 n.18 (S.D.N.Y. 2000)([http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=4887310188384829978&q=111+F.Supp.2d+294&hl=en&as_sdt=2002 full-text]) (footnotes omitted).</ref>}}
   
 
Object code is not [[human-readable]] and for a lengthy [[program]], the object code is so long and complex that it would take a skilled [[programmer]] months (and perhaps years) to understand how the [[program]] works and to extract any underlying [[idea]]s or [[algorithm]]s. This difficulty enables [[software developer]]s to [[distribute]]d their [[program]]s to the public with confidence that any [[trade secret]]s contained in the object code will not be able to be extracted without an enormous investment of time and highly skilled manpower.
 
Object code is not [[human-readable]] and for a lengthy [[program]], the object code is so long and complex that it would take a skilled [[programmer]] months (and perhaps years) to understand how the [[program]] works and to extract any underlying [[idea]]s or [[algorithm]]s. This difficulty enables [[software developer]]s to [[distribute]]d their [[program]]s to the public with confidence that any [[trade secret]]s contained in the object code will not be able to be extracted without an enormous investment of time and highly skilled manpower.

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