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Definitions Edit

Systems engineering (also known as systems design engineering or SE) is

[t]he overarching process that a program team applies to transition from a stated capability to an operationally effective and suitable system. SE encompasses the application of SE processes across the acquisition life cycle (adapted to each and every phase) and is intended to be the integrating mechanism for balanced solutions addressing capability needs, design considerations and constraints, as well as limitations imposed by technology, budget, and schedule. The SE processes are applied early in concept definition, and then continuously throughout the total life cycle.[1]
an interdisciplinary approach aimed at enabling the realization of successful systems. It focuses on defining client needs and required functionality to address those needs early in planning, and then carries out design and operation while considering the complete problem from both business and technical perspectives.[2]
[an] engineering discipline whose responsibility is creating and executing an interdisciplinary process to ensure that the customer and all other stakeholder needs are satisfied in a high-quality, trustworthy, cost-efficient, and schedule-compliant manner throughout a system's entire life cycle.[3]
[an] [i]nterdisciplinary approach governing the total technical and managerial effort required to transform a set of stakeholder needs, expectations, and constraints into a solution and to support that solution throughout its life.[4]
[an] engineering discipline whose responsibility is creating and executing an interdisciplinary process to ensure that the customer and all other stakeholder needs are satisfied in a high-quality, trustworthy, cost-efficient, and schedule-compliant manner throughout a system's entire life cycle.[5]

References Edit

  1. Defense Acquisition University, Glossary, at B-179 (13th ed. Nov. 2009) (full-text).
  2. Intelligent Transportation Systems: Improved DOT Collaboration and Communication Could Enhance the Use of Technology to Manage Congestion, at 27 n.44.
  3. NIST Special Publication 800-160, at B-14.
  4. NISTIR 8062, Glossary, at 28.
  5. Id.
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