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* [[Security assurance]] (i.e., the grounds for confidence that the [[security functionality]], when employed within an [[information system]] or its supporting [[infrastructure]], is effective in its application).
 
* [[Security assurance]] (i.e., the grounds for confidence that the [[security functionality]], when employed within an [[information system]] or its supporting [[infrastructure]], is effective in its application).
   
[[Critical system]]s and their [[operating environment]]s must be trustworthy despite a very wide range of adversities and [[adversaries]]. Historically, many [[system]] uses assumed the existence of a [[trustworthy computing]] base that would provide a suitable foundation for such [[computing]]. However, this assumption has not been justified.
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[[Critical system]]s and their [[operating environment]]s must be trustworthy despite a very wide range of adversities and adversaries. Historically, many [[system]] uses assumed the existence of a [[trustworthy computing]] base that would provide a suitable foundation for such [[computing]]. However, this assumption has not been justified.
   
 
[[Scalable]] trustworthiness will be essential for many national- and world-scale [[system]]s, including those supporting [[critical infrastructure]]s. Current methodologies for creating [[high-assurance system]]s do not scale to the size of today’s — let alone tomorrow’s — [[critical system]]s.
 
[[Scalable]] trustworthiness will be essential for many national- and world-scale [[system]]s, including those supporting [[critical infrastructure]]s. Current methodologies for creating [[high-assurance system]]s do not scale to the size of today’s — let alone tomorrow’s — [[critical system]]s.

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