The IT Law Wiki
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* [[Security assurance]] (i.e., the grounds for confidence that the [[security functionality]], when employed within an [[information system]] or its supporting [[infrastructure]], is effective in its application).
 
* [[Security assurance]] (i.e., the grounds for confidence that the [[security functionality]], when employed within an [[information system]] or its supporting [[infrastructure]], is effective in its application).
   
One key step in reducing [[online fraud]] and [[identity theft]] is to increase the level of trust associated with identities in [[cyberspace]].
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[[Spoof]]ed [[website]]s, stolen [[password]]s, and [[compromise]]d [[login]] accounts are all symptoms of an untrustworthy [[computing]] environment. One key step in reducing [[online fraud]] and [[identity theft]] is to increase the level of trust associated with identities in [[cyberspace]].
 
[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Security]]
 
[[Category:Evidence]]
 
[[Category:Evidence]]

Revision as of 21:46, 26 June 2010

Evidence

Trustworthiness of documentary evidence or testimony is based primarily on subjective factors, but can include objective measurements such as established reliability.

Computing

Trustworthiness is a characteristic or property of an information system that expresses the degree to which the system can be expected to preserve the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the information being processed, stored, or transmitted by the system.

Trustworthy information systems are systems that are worthy of being trusted to operate within defined levels of risk despite the environmental disruptions, human errors, and purposeful attacks that are expected to occur in the specified environments of operation. Two factors affecting the trustworthiness of an information system include:

Spoofed websites, stolen passwords, and compromised login accounts are all symptoms of an untrustworthy computing environment. One key step in reducing online fraud and identity theft is to increase the level of trust associated with identities in cyberspace.