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Citation Edit

Food and Drug Administration, URGENT/11 Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities in a Widely-Used Third-Party Software Component May Introduce Risks During Use of Certain Medical Devices: FDA Safety Communication (Oct. 1, 2019) (full-text).

Overview Edit

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing patients, health care providers and facility staff, and manufacturers about cybersecurity vulnerabilities that may introduce risks for certain medical devices and hospital networks. The FDA is not aware of any confirmed adverse events related to these vulnerabilities. However, software to exploit these vulnerabilities is already publicly available.

A security firm has identified 11 vulnerabilities, named "URGENT/11." These vulnerabilities may allow anyone to remotely take control of the Medical device and change its function, cause denial of service, or cause information leaks or logical flaws, which may prevent device function.

These vulnerabilities exist in IPnet, a third-party software component that supports network communications between computers. Though the IPnet software may no longer be supported by the original software vendor, some manufacturers have a license that allows them to continue to use it without support. Therefore, the software may be incorporated into other software applications, equipment, and systems which may be used in a variety of medical and industrial devices that are still in use today.

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